Videos By Me Archives | Sergei Polunin

Category: Videos By Me

Videos created by me, Pam Boehme Simon.

Lucky Ballerinas

Lucky Ballerinas

Lucky ballerinas? Or, are they…

Brief bit of ballet background

Ballet originated in the early 1600’s. For the first 75 years or so, it was Men Only. Women weren’t allowed. If a role called for a female, it was danced by a man.

Once accepted, however, the woman quickly became the star of the ballet, and thus, the ballerina was born. A male dancer struts his stuff in a quick solo variation in most classical ballets, but, when it comes to the pas de deux (steps for two), he is relegated to more of a supporting role. His main purpose becomes to assist his tutu-clad other half. That is… hoisting her high into the air, toting her about the stage, spinning her around on pointe, and in general, making her look good. Sometimes so much so, that I recall once hearing a male dancer refer to himself as “scenery.”

Along comes Sergei

From Russia to the Ukraine to London, Sergei Polunin has partnered some of the most celebrated ballerinas. Natalia Osipova, Svetlana Zakharova, and Tamara Rojo to name just a few. While all the world might wish to dance with him, these women are a few of the lucky ones who do. Although… can a ballerina be considered lucky if the onlookers can’t take their eyes off of HIM?? It’s as if the ballerinas are dancing back up! Audiences, for a change, have their eyes glued to Sergei while a ballerina flitters about him, reduced to a mere distraction. Sergei Polunin is the man who makes ballerinas disappear.


Disclaimer: This little excursion into ballet history is not meant to cast dispersions on any of the talented and hardworking women ballet dancers in the world today. The idea is to point out, with a little tongue-in-cheek, just how remarkable Sergei Polunin is.

Videos

The featured videos in this entry are photo montages of Sergei Polunin partnering several different ballerinas in some of ballet’s most passionate pas de deux. Presented with him are some of his “fortunate” ballerinas.

Interesting Bit Of Trivia

The first of the two videos below was deemed “so hot” that the YouTube bots banned it. The ruling was overturned once human eyes addressed the issue and agreed that the performers did, in fact have on tights, and were not naked.

“Sergei And The Ballerinas”
“Entrelacé”
Being Spartacus

Being Spartacus

Spartacus, a ballet in three acts by Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian, is known for its lively rhythms and strong energy. It was premiered by the Kirov Ballet in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) in 1956, and its revised form was debuted in 1968 by the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow.

Watch the video

In the video below, Sergei Polunin is featured as Spartacus. We also see him as Crassus, the anti-hero, whom he often portrays equally as well.


Becoming Spartacus

The role of Spartacus in the ballet of the same name, is extremely demanding. It requires a very strong and capable ballet dancer. He must have a wide dramatic range, exceptional ballon (leaping ability) and be a top-tier athlete. It can be difficult for a dancer to do justice to the role. Sergei Polunin excels at it. Sergei becomes Spartacus. His physical attributes and talents, along with his ability to completely immerse himself emotionally in a role, make him a stellar choice.

How the story came to be

The story of Khachaturian’s ballet (with libretto by Yuri Grigorovich) was derived from a book by Raffaello Giovagnolli that details events from an historical Roman slave revolt. Its leader, Spartacus, was a Thracian warrior who had been captured in battle. The rebellion’s high point was its seizure of Mount Vesuvius as a stronghold. After two years of fighting, the rebellion was finally put down by Marcus Licinius Crassus, and the warrior Spartacus fell in battle.

Synopsis of the ballet

Act I

Invasion
The military machine of imperial Rome, led by Crassus, wages a cruel campaign of conquest, destroying everything in its path. Among the chained prisoners, who are doomed to captivity, are man and wife, Spartacus and Phrygia.

Spartacus’s Monologue.
Spartacus is in despair. Born a free man, he is now a prisoner in chains.

The Human Market
Dealers separate the men and women prisoners for sale to rich Romans. Spartacus is parted from Phrygia.

Phrygia’s Monologue
Phrygia is overcome with grief. She thinks with horror of the terrifying ordeals that lie ahead of her.

Crassus’s Palace
Mimes & courtesans entertain the guests, making fun of Phrygia, Crassus’s new conquest. Aegina, a favorite concubine of Crassus, draws Crassus into a frenzied, bacchanalian dance. Dizzy with wine & passion, Crassus demands a spectacle. Two gladiators are to fight to the end in helmets with closed visors (without seeing each other). The victor’s helmet is removed. It is Spartacus.

Spartacus’s Monologue
Against his will, Spartacus has been forced to fatally defeat a fellow armsman. His despair develops into anger & protest. He will no longer tolerate captivity. He vows to win back his freedom.

The Gladiators’ Barracks
Spartacus incites the gladiators to revolt. They swear an oath of loyalty to him and they break out of the barracks to freedom.

Act II

The Appian Way
Having broken out of their captivity and finding themselves on Appian Way, surrounded by shepherds, Spartacus’s followers call the latter to join the uprising. They proclaim Spartacus as their leader.

Spartacus’s Monologue
The thought of Phrygia’s fate as Casuss’s conquest gives Spartacus no peace. He is haunted by memories of his wife whom he thinks of day & night.

Crasuss’s Villa
His search for Phrygia leads Spartacus to Crassus’s villa. The two lovers are overjoyed at their reunion. But, due to the arrival of a procession of patricians, led by Aegina, they are forced to hide.

Aegina’s Monologue
Aegina has long dreamed of seducing and gaining power over Crassus. Her goal is to win him and thereby gain legal admittance to the world of the Roman nobility.

Feast at Crasuss’s Villa
Crassus celebrates his victories. The patricians sing his praises. The festivities are cut short by an alarming piece of news: Spartacus and his men have all but surrounded the villa. The panic-stricken guests disperse. Crassus and Aegina are also forced to flee. Spartacus breaks into the villa.

Spartacus’s Monologue
He is elated and filled with faith that the uprising will be successful.

Spartacus’s Victory
Spartacus’s men have taken Crassus prisoner and want to dispose of him. Spartacus is not bent on revenge and suggests that they should engage in single-handed combat. Crassus accepts the challenge and suffers defeat when Spartacus knocks the sword out of his hand. Crassus makes ready demonstratively to meet his end, but Spartacus, with a gesture of contempt, lets him go. That all shall know of Crassus’s dishonor is punishment enough. The jubilant insurgents praise the victory of Spartacus.

Act III

Crasuss Takes His Revenge
Crassus is tormented by his disgrace. Fanning his hurt pride, Aegina calls on him to take his revenge. The only way forward, she chides, is to defeat the insurgents. Crassus summons his legions. Aegina sees him off to battle.

Aegina’s Monologue
Spartacus is Aegina’s enemy too. The defeat of Crassus will be her downfall. Aegina devises a plan. She will sew dissension in Spartacus’s encampment.

Spartacus’s Encampment.
Spartacus & Phrygia are happy to be together. Then suddenly, his military commanders bring the news that Crassus is on the move with a large army. Spartacus decides to give battle. Overcome by cowardice, some of his warriors (who were simple shepherds a short time ago) desert their leader.

Dissension
Aegina infiltrates the ranks of the defectors. Together with her fellow courtesans she seduces the men with wine and dance. As a result, the men throw all caution to the winds and she convinces them to return to Spartacus’ camp. Having successfully sprung her trap, Aegina hands them all over to Crassus.

Spartacus’s Monologue
Crassus is consumed by the wish for revenge. Spartacus shall pay for the humiliation that he, Crassus, was forced to undergo.

The Last Battle
Surrounded by the Roman legions, Spartacus’s devoted friends perish in unequal combat. Spartacus fights on fearlessly right up to the bitter end but, closing in on the wounded hero, the Roman soldiers crucify him on their spears.

Requiem
Phrygia retrieves Spartacus’s body. She mourns her beloved. She is inconsolable. Raising her arms, Phrygia appeals to the heavens that the memory of Spartacus live forever.


Delicate Dominance, The Hands of Sergei Polunin

Delicate Dominance, The Hands of Sergei Polunin

Delicate Dominance… Sergei’s hands, strong as steel yet tenderly graceful. Able to propel a ballerina skyward, yet his port de bras is soft beyond compare. Such stunning “carriage of the arms” he looks more like a Da Vinci sculpture than flesh and blood. Yet, he is able to move one to tears with a gesture so exquisitely human, it can break your heart.

Music: “Nothing” by Kai Engel with permission via the Free Music Archive under an Attribution License.


About Sergei…

Sergei Polunin is a Ukrainian ballet dancer. Famous for his “once every hundred years” talent, he has incredulous elevation and impeccable technique. From an early age, he displayed glorious dramatic range. Home videos of him as a tiny boy improvising to Pavarotti are very foretelling. At age 20, he became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer.

Ballet gained an unprecedented new awareness when he danced in Hozier’s viral video ”Take Me To Church.” People who never would have never paid any attention to ballet began to watch the tattooed phenom. He is generally attributed with bringing ballet to the modern common man. Classical, yet cutting edge, Sergei starred in Diesel’s “Make Love Not Walls” campaign and has put his mark on many other promotions.

Sergei is a much sought after model and actor. Fashion designers love his breathtaking physique and brooding good looks. He has garnered only positive reviews for his acting. His appearances include Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Orient Express, the biographical documentary Dancer, The White Crow, and Red Sparrow.

If you enjoyed this, please consider visiting my fan site at https://sergeipoluningracefulbeast.com or my blog at https://pamboehmesimon.com for additional videos and more.

This is a ballet | балет iMovie by Pam Boehme Simon.
Thank you for watching.

Sergei Surprises Guests

Sergei Surprises Guests

Sergei surprises guests? Stuns would be more like it… Unbeknownst to the host of bigwigs, celebrities, and other guests at a Milan’s 2016 Fashion Week show, Sergei Polunin / Сергей Полунин was about to bring down the house.

Beauty, power, angst… it was glorious.


Living, breathing, moving sculpture…

About Sergei

Sergei Polunin was the dancer who starred in Hozier’s viral video, “Take Me To Church” but his fame is far greater than just that. One day, he will be legendary. Sergei Polunin is a Ukrainian ballet dancer. Famous for his “once every hundred years” talent, he has incredulous elevation and impeccable technique.

From an early age, he displayed glorious dramatic range. Home videos of him as a tiny boy improvising to Pavarotti are very foretelling. At age 20, he became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer.

Ballet gained an unprecedented new awareness when he danced in Hozier’s viral video ”Take Me To Church.” People who never would have never paid any attention to ballet began to watch the tattooed phenom. He is generally attributed with bringing ballet to the modern common man.

Classical, yet cutting edge, Sergei starred in Diesel’s “Make Love Not Walls” campaign and has put his mark on many other promotions. Sergei is a much sought after model and actor. Fashion designers love his breathtaking physique and brooding good looks.

He has garnered only positive reviews for his acting. His appearances include Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Orient Express, the biographical documentary Dancer, The White Crow, and Red Sparrow.

If you enjoyed this, please consider visiting my fan site at https://sergeipoluningracefulbeast.com or my blog at https://pamboehmesimon.com for additional videos and more.

This is a ballet | балет iMovie by Pam Boehme Simon.

Thank you for watching.

Huge Ballet Jumps!

Huge Ballet Jumps!

Huge ballet jumps is right. This is a video featuring Sergei Polunin in “Le Corsaire” and showcasing his incredible elevation and incredulous ballet leaps. His “signature” leap, the 540 Rivoltade is nothing short of spectacular.

Scroll down for video.

Watch “Huge Ballet Jumps! here.

This video originally posted in November 2017 and currently has almost 490,000 views. It has been archived here in an effort to preserve and keep available treasured footage of this future dance legend.


About Sergei

Sergei Polunin is a Ukrainian ballet dancer. Famous for his “once every hundred years” talent, he has incredulous elevation and impeccable technique. From an early age, he displayed glorious dramatic range. Home videos of him as a tiny boy improvising to Pavarotti are very foretelling. At age 19, he became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer.

Ballet gained an unprecedented new awareness when he danced in Hozier’s viral video ”Take Me To Church.” People who never would have never paid any attention to ballet began to watch the tattooed phenom. He is generally attributed with bringing ballet to the modern common man.

Classical, yet cutting edge, Sergei starred in Diesel’s “Make Love Not Walls” campaign and has put his mark on many other promotions. Sergei is a much sought after model and actor. Fashion designers love his breathtaking physique and brooding good looks.

He has garnered only positive reviews for his acting. His appearances include Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Orient Express, the biographical documentary Dancer, The White Crow, and Red Sparrow.


For additional videos and more, please visit my blog at https://pamboehmesimon.com

This is a ballet | балет iMovie by Pam Boehme Simon.

Thank you for watching.

If You Fall, I Will Catch You

If You Fall, I Will Catch You

If you fall I will catch you… a beautiful sentiment, a beautiful promise. What more can two people do for each other than to simply be there.

This video was created in January 2018 by Pam Boehme Simon. In my ongoing effort to catalog and preserve all things “Sergei” it is being archived here for all to enjoy.


“If You Fall, I Will Catch You” starring Sergei Polunin and ballerina Natalia Osipova… ballet superstars, and at one time, real life companions.


Choreography: “Silent Echo” by Russell Maliphant

Alternative Music: “Hachiko” by The Kyoto Connection with permission under license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

Who Is Sergei?

Sergei Polunin is a Ukrainian ballet dancer. Famous for his “once every hundred years” talent, he has incredulous elevation and impeccable technique. From an early age, he displayed glorious dramatic range. Home videos of him as a tiny boy improvising to Pavarotti are very foretelling. At age 19, he became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer.

Ballet gained an unprecedented new awareness when he danced in Hozier’s viral video ”Take Me To Church.” People who never would have never paid any attention to ballet began to watch. He is generally attributed with bringing ballet to the modern common man.

Classical, yet cutting edge, Sergei starred in Diesel’s “Make Love Not Walls” campaign and has put his mark on many other promotions. Sergei is a much sought after model and actor. Fashion designers love his breathtaking physique and brooding good looks.

He has garnered only positive reviews for his acting. His appearances include Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Orient Express, the biographical documentary Dancer, The White Crow, and Red Sparrow.

If you enjoyed this video…

Please bookmark my fan site at https://sergeipoluningracefulbeast.com or visit my blog at https://pamboehmesimon.com  for additional videos and much more.

This is a ballet | балет iMovie by Pam Boehme Simon.

Thank you for watching.

His Nature

His Nature

“A man’s power to connect his thought with its proper symbol, and so to utter it, depends on the simplicity of his character, that is, upon his love of truth, and his desire to communicate it without loss.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature

“His Nature” Sergei Polunin

Music: “Nature Boy” performed by Aurora, written in 1947 by Eden Ahbez

Visit AURORA’s website: http://po.st/AURORAWeb

Dancer: Sergei Polunin

Sergei Polunin is a Ukrainian ballet dancer. Famous for his “once every hundred years” talent, he has incredulous elevation and impeccable technique.

From an early age, he displayed glorious dramatic range. Home videos of him as a tiny boy improvising to Pavarotti are very foretelling. At age 20, he became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer.

Ballet gained an unprecedented new awareness when he danced in Hozier’s viral video ”Take Me To Church.” People who never would have never paid any attention to ballet began to watch the tattooed phenom. He is generally attributed with bringing ballet to the modern common man.

Classical, yet cutting edge, Sergei starred in Diesel’s “Make Love Not Walls” campaign and has put his mark on many other promotions. Sergei is a much sought after model and actor. Fashion designers love his breathtaking physique and brooding good looks. He has garnered only positive reviews for his acting. His appearances include Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Orient Express, the biographical documentary Dancer, The White Crow, and Red Sparrow.

If you enjoyed this, please consider subscribing to my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/PamBoehmeSimon and “like” my playlist “Sergei Polunin, Graceful Beast” as well.

For additional videos and more, visit my fan site at https://sergeipoluningracefulbeast.com or my blog at https://pamboehmesimon.com

This is a ballet | балет iMovie by Pam Boehme Simon. Thank you for watching.

Sergei Rocks, Rolls Le Corsaire

Sergei Rocks, Rolls Le Corsaire

The grand and glorious Le Corsaire.  Manly men, beautiful girls, amazing costumes, and difficult choreography… this ballet has it all.

Le Corsaire is a ballet typically presented in three acts, with a libretto originally created by Jules-Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges loosely based on the poem The Corsair by Lord Byron. Originally choreographed by Joseph Mazilier to the music of Adolphe Adam, it was first presented by the ballet of the Théâtre Impérial de l’Opéra in Paris on January 23, 1856. All modern productions of Le Corsaire are derived from the revivals staged by the Ballet Master Marius Petipa for the Imperial Ballet of St. Petersburg throughout the mid to late 19th century.

The ballet has many celebrated passages which are often excerpted from the full-length work and performed independently.  The most well known being the so-called “Le Corsaire pas de deux” which is among classical ballet’s most famous and performed excerpts.  Portions of this excerpt are presented below.  First, with the original music, and secondly and just for fun, with some good ol’ rock and roll!

A 2014 performance of Le Corsaire with Sergei Polunin as “Ali” and Vera Sabantseva as “Medora” at the Novosibirsk State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre.

 

Now, enjoy the “Rock & Roll” version with music by Jahzzar, “The Last Ones.”

 

Both videos, and hundreds (literally) of other Sergei videos may be found on the Sergei Polunin, Graceful Beast YouTube channel.

Waltz Sergei?

Waltz Sergei?

Waltz Sergei?   What a lovely idea!

Music: “Sunset” by Kai Engel

Ballet: Coppélia

Choreography: Roland Petit

Performance Notes: Stanislavsky Ballet, 2013.

Dancers: Sergei Polunin & Kristina Shapran

Sergei Polunin is a Ukrainian ballet dancer. He is famous for his “once every hundred years” talent, incredulous elevation, and impeccable technique. From an early age, he displayed glorious dramatic range. Home videos of him as a tiny boy improvising to Pavarotti are very foretelling. At age 20, he became the Royal Ballet’s youngest ever principal dancer.

Ballet gained an unprecedented new awareness when he danced in Hozier’s viral video ”Take Me To Church.” People who never would have never paid any attention to ballet began to watch the tattooed phenom. He is generally attributed with bringing ballet to the modern common man. Classical, yet cutting edge, Sergei starred in Diesel’s “Make Love Not Walls” campaign and has put his mark on many other promotions.

Sergei is a much sought after model and actor. Fashion designers love his breathtaking physique and brooding good looks. He has garnered only positive reviews for his acting. His appearances include Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Orient Express, the biographical documentary Dancer, The White Crow, and Red Sparrow.

If you enjoyed this, please consider subscribing to my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/PamBoehmeSimon and “like” my playlist “Sergei Polunin, Graceful Beast” as well.

For additional videos and more, bookmark my fan site at https://sergeipoluningracefulbeast.com or my blog at https://pamboehmesimon.com

This is a ballet | балет iMovie by Pam Boehme Simon. Thank you for watching.

Poetry In Motion

Poetry In Motion

A collection of original poems written by Pam Boehme Simon (me) that were inspired by the visual and visceral tsunami evoked by Sergei Polunin when he dances (or just stares into the camera), and the videos that go with each.  A few quotes from other random folks as well…

 

 

Exquisite Torture

 

“This is about ballet dancer Sergei Polunin, and the exquisite torture he endures, yet embraces.

In no other art form is the artist so much the medium in which he works as in dance.

A dancer so divine no longer belongs to himself but to the art. He is a prisoner of, and to, the art form which he himself helps create.

In this prison, the dancer languishes, yet revels. It can not be denied or forsaken.

So, gloriously, the dancer throws himself into the exquisite torture.”

– Pam Boehme Simon

 

Visages De Sergei

 

“His high caliber power, strength, and ballon is belied by the beautiful vulnerability in his eyes. Through clear, blue clerestories witness the joy, the sadness, the torment, and the exultation of the artist.”

– Pam Boehme Simon

 

Dream On

 

“Are you a divine human? Or a human-esque deity?

Either way, we would keep you on the wooden pedestal where we come to worship. When the curtains part and you are bathed in the light of our admiration, our hearts soar.

I dream that your heart is with ours. For a soul so beauteously gifted, ballet should not catch and pinch. What you have given ballet, I dream is returned to you many times over.

I dream that what we see as you dance upon the pedestal, mirrors your happiness of being.

And finally, I dream the flickering spark that stirred you to discover your offerings, flares bright once more so that the shackles and weights you have come to know burn away, leaving you with the release and euphoria given you by ballet in the beginning.”

– Pam Boehme Simon

 

Rarest Spun Heaven Metal

 

“Oh bliss! Bliss and heaven! Oh, it was gorgeousness and gorgeosity made flesh. It was like a bird of rarest spun heaven metal or like silvery wine flowing in a spaceship, gravity all nonsense now.” – Alex, A Clockwork Orange

 

The Agony and the Ecstasy

 

“Dedication is expensive. It will cost you your life.” – Irving Stone, The Agony and the Ecstasy

“One should not become an artist because he can, but because he must.” – Irving Stone, The Agony and the Ecstasy

 

Dancing Star

 

“You need chaos in your soul to give birth to a dancing star.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

 

 

 

Rebel

 

“Sergei channels his idol, James Dean. But with his brooding good looks, and the white hot intensity with which he completely destroys the stage, Sergei is the truer rebel.

Outspoken, and silent. Disciplined by ballet, but branded with a wild streak. Bound to the earth, yet consistently defies gravity. Can’t find bliss in the dance world… can’t breathe without it.”

– Pam Boehme Simon

 

For No One

 

“He left dance. He had danced for everyone…except himself.

Until the fire inside his soul began to die. But the ember was still warm.

His body and soul still longed to dance despite his mind’s objections. They fought against each other until raw emotion took over and banished the doubts.

Now purged, a new wind blew and the ember sparked. Now he knew. He had to dance. He must dance. But now, for no one… except himself.”

– Pam Boehme Simon

 

On the Eighth Day

 

“…and on the Eighth Day, the gods created a magnificent gift in the form of flesh, bone, muscle and sinew.

Beauteous to behold, within lives a soul, heart, spirit and passion equal to the instrument the gods so blessed him with.

So perfectly balanced is each exquisite aspect that he is capable of transcending mortal bounds and is free to move and dance with the elements of nature.

Earth, wind, fire, water… he imitates each at will…. and, we are thrilled at the sight.”

– Pam Boehme Simon

 

Breathless

 

“Breathless… as he dances. Breathless… as we watch.  He leaves us breathless with his raw emotion and flawless technique. Breathless that we are so blessed to witness him in his prime.

Future generations will envy us.”

– Pam Boehme Simon




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